Y A C H T S
I  N  T  E  R  N  A  T  I  O  N  A  L
M A G A Z I N E
 
STABILITY AT ANCHOR 

FROM EVOLUTION 
TO REVOLUTION 

By: REG POTTERTON   

    THERE WAS A STEADY SWELL HEAVING THROUGH THE ANCHORAGE THAT DAY, AND THE YACHTS IN THE BAY ROLLED AND WALLOWED IN ITS WAKE. ON ONE STATELY MOTOR YACHT THE OWNER AND GUESTS WERE ABOUT TO SIT FOR LUNCH AT THE AFT DECK DINING TABLE WHEN THE LOBSTER BISQUE AND SOME OF THE OWNER’S CHOICEST CRYSTAL SLID OFF THE TABLE AND CRASHED INTO THE SCUPPERS.

A board a 160' tridecker that had just dropped anchor, the intercom beeped in the wheelhouse. It was the owner's wife, calling from the master suite and sounding a little queasy. "Captain," she said, "I'm looking out of the window and the horizon is moving. Please do something about it."
    The captain touched a button on the console. Around him every boat in sight was still pitching and rolling, but on the tridecker serenity reigned. Apart from the gentlest up-and-down motion it was almost as if the boat sat on dry land. This was because her captain had just activated technology's latest—and by many accounts most effective —remedy for marine motion sickness: digitally-controlled stability at anchor.
    Until a couple of years ago it was taken for granted that anchored yachts rolled when the sea rolled. Depending on conditions the motion could be mild or severe, and those aboard had no choice but to put up with it or raise the hook and go somewhere else. While marine technology advanced on many fronts, anti-roll technology that might eliminate or reduce motion discomfort at anchor developed slowly.
    Some of the solutions to the problem owed more to wishful thinking than to practicality, including a 19th century design for a fully-gimbaled interior that tended to get stuck on the uproll. Among later developments: multiple gyroscopes coupled with control units the size of refrigerators; unwieldy flopper-stoppers, and space-eating, U-shaped anti-roll water tanks.
    None of them seems to be as practical or as efficient as high-speed stabilizer fin systems fitted with sensors that monitor angle, velocity and acceleration, and instantly transmit signals via digital controls that direct a counteractive response by the fins. In marine engineering circles this system, first installed by KoopNautic in the motor yacht Boadicea, a 230-footer launched in 1999 at Amels, has been hailed as the most revolutionary innovation in stability while anchored since the invention of the anchor itself. (For the sake of simplicity, such systems are abbreviated here as OAS, for On Anchor Stability.)

    The seed for an OAS fin system was planted by Sjoerd Veeman, Managing Director of Amels, and it was prompted by the request of Boadicea's owner that his new boat provide ultimate stability in all conditions, underway and anchored. The owner initially wanted anti-roll tank OAS but decided against this because these installations can take up as much as five percent of a boat's interior volume.

New fins awaiting for
shipment from factory.

New Fins

 

Yacht Faribana

The M/Y Faribana
after successful trials
with new OAS fin system.

Assembly

Assembling a stabilizer fin unit.

Go To Page 2

    Veeman called Theo Koop, founder of KoopNautic stabilizer systems, and Koop called Hans Ooms, Professor of Electronics at Delft University, a Dutch counterpart of MIT. Ooms is a pioneer in the design of stabilizer controls. Koop credits him with designing every KoopNautic control since Koop entered the stabilizer field. “I call him the father of our controls,” Koop told YIM. “The basic idea (for OAS) came from Veeman but it was Hans Ooms who designed and engineered the electronic controls that made it work on Boadicea.
    No sooner had Boadicea, the world’s first fin-fitted OAS yacht, been launched than she sailed off to the South Pacific. But word of the system’s successful performance, as reported by crew members, attracted the attention of Quantum Marine Engineering (QME), a small and resourceful company in South Florida known for its fin stabilizer expertise and the design and manufacture of integrated hydraulic systems and rapid response electronic controls.

Page 1 | 2 | 3

NOTE: We have used the generic designation OAS (On Anchor Stability) to avoid repetition of the proprietary acronyms used by Naiad/KoopNautic (DATUM, Dynamic Adaptive Technology for Universal Motion control) and by Quantum (ARC, Adaptive Ride Control). Click for PDF Acrobat FileSee the "Yachts International"
Magazine Article in a 270K PDF Adobe Acrobat file.
 
 
Broker John DeCaro
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33316 USA
Telephone: 954-671-0107
info@buyexploreryachts.com

Buy  Explorer Yachts  .com

 
 HOME   DESIGN   BROKERAGE   CHARTER   CREW   NEWS   F.A.Q.s   BIO   LINKS   EM@IL